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Halfway to the edge

You can view an amazingly distant object this month.
RELATED TOPICS: QUASARS
OMearaStephen
Part of the wonder of backyard observing is that we, with our modest telescopes, can probe deeply into the universe. And by pushing the limits of those instruments, we can edge ever closer to the beginning of time — not as close as Hubble, but close nevertheless.

In the June night sky after sunset, two quasars, one much more distant than the other, culminate for visual observers. Quasars are the universe’s most luminous objects. They represent the blazing cores of early galaxies whose tremendous light output (each is billions of times more luminous than our Sun) comes from gas falling into a supermassive black hole.

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