Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

Web Extra: Exploring the pulsar zoo

The objects Antony Hewish and Jocelyn Bell discovered in the late 1960s are even more bizarre than they originally imagined.
RELATED TOPICS: PULSARS | NEUTRON STARS
Scientists are finding that not all pulsars, like the one illustrated here, share the same properties as the ones first discovered in the late 1960s.
Scientists are finding that not all pulsars, like the one illustrated here, share the same properties as the ones first discovered in the late 1960s.
Don Dixon for Astronomy
In 1967, Antony Hewish’s graduate student Jocelyn Bell came upon a surprising signal in the radio data she was studying: Radio pulses were coming every 1.3 seconds from a fixed location in the sky. The discovery was so surprising that Hewish and Bell even privately considered the idea that the signal was from aliens. After they found more radio pulses, though, they realized they had come upon a new type of object, now aptly called pulsars.

Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the dense stellar remnants left behind after supernova explosions. And as more scientists have studied these peculiar objects over the past two decades, they’re realizing not all are like the ones Hewish and Bell uncovered. In “Explore the pulsar menagerie,” expert Victoria M. Kaspi reveals the various subclasses of these neutron stars and how such discoveries are forcing astrophysicists to rewrite the textbook on stellar remnants.
Downloadable File(s)
0

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Read and share your comments on this article
Comment on this article
Want to leave a comment?
Only registered members of Astronomy.com are allowed to comment on this article. Registration is FREE and only takes a couple minutes.

Login or Register now.
0 comments
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter. View our Privacy Policy.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
RCLP_ASY_0301_mediumrectangle

Untangle the mysteries of our solar system and its moons with this free download.

Find us on Facebook