Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

Fly over Ceres in new video

The video is based on observations of Ceres that were taken from Dawn’s first mapping orbit.
RELATED TOPICS: SOLAR SYSTEM | CERES | DAWN | DWARF PLANETS
Ceres 2015
The images come from Dawn's first mapping orbit at Ceres at an altitude of 8,400 mile (13,600 kilometers), as well as navigational images taken from 3,200 miles (5,100km) away.
NASA
A new animated video of dwarf planet Ceres, based on images taken by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, provides a unique perspective of this heavily cratered mysterious world.

The video is based on observations of Ceres that were taken from Dawn’s first mapping orbit at an altitude of 8,400 miles (13,600 kilometers), as well as the most recent navigational images taken from 3,200 miles (5,100km).

Data from 80 images are combined into the video. Analysis of overlapping images provided 3-D detail. The vertical dimension is exaggerated by a factor of two in the video.

“We used a three-dimensional terrain model that we had produced based on the images acquired so far,” said Ralf Jaumann of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin. “They will become increasingly detailed as the mission progresses, with each additional orbit bringing us closer to the surface.”

Dawn entered its second mapping orbit June 3. It will spend the rest of the month observing the dwarf planet from 2,700 miles (4,400km) above its surface. The spacecraft will conduct intensive observations of Ceres, completing orbits of about three days each.

Earlier this year, Dawn made history as the first mission to visit a dwarf planet and the first to orbit two distinct extraterrestrial targets. It studied Vesta, a protoplanet in the main asteroid belt, for 14 months in 2011 and 2012 and arrived at Ceres on March 6, 2015.
0

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Read and share your comments on this article
Comment on this article
Want to leave a comment?
Only registered members of Astronomy.com are allowed to comment on this article. Registration is FREE and only takes a couple minutes.

Login or Register now.
0 comments
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter. View our Privacy Policy.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
asy_gravitational_eguide

Click here to download a FREE gravitational waves PDF curated by Astronomy magazine.

Find us on Facebook