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Mercury and Venus return

Warm July nights provide a perfect opportunity to track down distant Pluto, though most observers will spend their time enjoying Mars and Saturn near their peaks.
Venus and its fainter cousin, innermost Mercury
It’s not often you can see eight worlds in one evening, but if skies are clear after sunset in late July, you should be able to observe from Mercury to Pluto. The Moon isn’t shy this month either, passing directly in front of Neptune and Taurus the Bull’s brightest star, Aldeb­aran. It all makes for an action-packed viewing season despite the short summer nights.

Mercury and Venus are among the more challenging of the solar system objects. Both scrape the western horizon during twilight in the latter half of July. Mercury passes behind the Sun on July 6 and then climbs slowly into view. It slides 0.5° north of Venus on the 16th, but the two are hopelessly lost in the Sun’s glare.

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