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Couldn’t Hyperion’s low density and spongy texture be better explained by it being a captured comet?

Jose Gonzalez, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
RELATED TOPICS: SOLAR SYSTEM | HYPERION
Hyperion
Saturn’s moon Hyperion presents a puzzle to planetary scientists with its spongelike surface, which looks more like a sea creature than a rocky satellite. It’s also oddly large for such an irregularly shaped moon, with an average diameter of about 170 miles (275 kilometers).

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