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How big would methane raindrops be on Titan?

Douglas Kaupa, Colorado Springs, Colorado
RELATED TOPICS: TITAN
Clouds on Titan create methane rain, causing changes on the surface below.
Methane raindrops on Titan could grow to be almost a centimeter across, nearly twice the size of large raindrops on Earth (about 6 millimeters). And, thanks to Titan’s thicker atmosphere and lower gravity, they would fall much more slowly, roughly 5.2 feet per second (1.6 m/s), the speed at which snowflakes fall on Earth (compared to rates of terrestrial rainfall at up to 30 ft/s [9 m/s]). The slower speed and larger drops would make it easier to see that raindrops (on Titan and Earth) tend to be distorted and flattened by the atmosphere as they fall.

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