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Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf star, so would it appear red from the surface of an Earth-like planet in that star's habitable zone?

Kevin Alcott, Naperville, Illinois
RELATED TOPICS: RED DWARF
A human’s view from an Earth-like planet around a red dwarf star might look something like this artist’s impression of a sunset on the exoplanet orbiting Gliese 667C, which is part of a triple star system.
Astronomers haven’t found planets around our Sun’s nearest neighbor, the red dwarf Proxima Centauri. But there’s good reason to keep looking. Most exoplanets orbit red dwarfs — the most common and longest-lived type of star. Astronomers believe as many as half might have rocky planets. And Kepler spacecraft data imply perhaps 6 percent could have Earth-sized planets in their habitable zones — the region where liquid surface water can exist. That prevalence gives hope for life in the cosmos.

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