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January 2014

ASY-CV0114
The world's best-selling astronomy magazine offers you the most exciting, visually stunning, and timely coverage of the heavens above. Each monthly issue includes expert science reporting, vivid color photography, complete sky coverage, spot-on observing tips, informative telescope reviews, and much more! All this in an easy-to-understand, user-friendly style that's perfect for astronomers at any level.

Features

Top 10 space stories of 2013

Astronomers refined the composition and age of the universe, our galaxy's biggest black hole unraveled a gas cloud, and a massive meteoroid exploded above Russia.

Web Extra: The past year's other huge space stories

The end of 2012 through fall of 2013 had a lot of important discoveries. Here are the ones that didn’t quite make the top ten.

Curiosity's latest findings from Mars

In August 2012, NASA's newest rover landed in Mars' Gale Crater. From finding ancient streambeds to analyzing hundreds of samples, the rover has kept busy helping scientists learn about the planet's habitability.

Web Extra: Spy on the Mars Curiosity rover

Use an interactive map to see what everyone’s favorite interplanetary robot has been up to.

How much water is on the Moon?

If frozen water fills some of the Moon's craters, the supply could quench future colonists' thirst. But reality might be more complicated.

Web Extra: More missions that looked for Moon water

Learn more about the spacecraft that have tried to find out how icy our satellite is.

Comet ISON's final stab at glory

This visitor should remain a fine binocular object as it skims near the North Star during its retreat.

Web Extra: Everything you need to know about Comet ISON

Check out Astronomy.com's complete coverage of this visitor from the outer solar system.

Target 12 kinds of globular clusters

A century ago, astronomers Harlow Shapley and Helen Sawyer divided globulars into a dozen types. Find out what makes them different.

Departments

StarDome and Path of the Planets

In Every Issue

From the Editor
Breakthrough
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Final Frontier
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