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January 2010

This month’s issue of Astronomy magazine explains how cosmologists are working to better understand the universe’s large-scale structures, reveals possible candidates for what the Star of Bethlehem could have been, provides 40 winter deep-sky objects to target, and more. The issue also includes the four-page supplement, “2010 Guide to the Night Sky.” Video: Editor David J. Eicher previews the January 2010 issue.

Features

Guide to the sky 2010

Astronomy's 2010 Guide to the Night Sky

What galaxy superclusters tell us about the universe

Astronomers are working to understand the universe's large-scale structures — how they formed and how they affect cosmic expansion.

Web extra: Fly through the nearby universe

A southern-sky survey mapped more than 110,000 nearby galaxies to show cosmic structure.

What was the Star of Bethlehem?

Astronomy can rule out several candidates for the sight that appeared to the wise men — but it can't eliminate them all.

How do planetary nebulae form?

Over the past decade, astronomers have cracked the code of planetary nebula shapes. Now we know why these stellar coffins appear in such a variety of intricate styles.

Web extra: The many shapes of planetary nebulae

Browse a sample of these interesting sky-targets, and then seek them out with your own telescope.

Tour the Fornax Supercluster

Medium- to large-aperture telescopes reveal dozens of galaxies in this small region of sky.

Target 40 wonderful winter sky treats

The winter sky is loaded with great deep-sky objects. Through your telescope, you can pick them off like ornaments on a celestial tree.

Web extra: A gallery of winter wonders

These beautiful images will make your eyes water without cold weather.

Astronomy tests a hot new spectroscope

You may have seen sunspots and prominences, but have you observed the Sun's spectrum? The Lhires Lite spectroscope makes such observations easy.

Departments

This Month in Astronomy
Beautiful Universe
Letters
Web Talk
Bob Berman’s Strange Universe
David H. Levy’s Evening Stars
Astro News
The Sky this Month
Steven James O’Meara's Secret Sky
Glenn Chaple's Observing Basics

Screw-in solar filter hazards

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