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June 2007

The world's best-selling astronomy magazine offers you the most exciting, visually stunning, and timely coverage of the heavens above. Each monthly issue includes expert science reporting, vivid color photography, complete sky coverage, spot-on observing tips, informative telescope reviews, and much more! All this in an easy-to-understand, user-friendly style that's perfect for astronomers at any level.

Features

The supernova next door

Eta Carinae's massive eruptions warn the superstar's explosive destruction may come sooner than suspected.

Online extra: A conversation with John Martin

Get the lowdown on Eta Carinae''s mysteries from astronomer John Martin.

The first new world

When William Herschel discovered Uranus in 1781 - the first planet found since antiquity - he opened a frontier astronomers are still exploring.

Online extra: The Herschel astronomers

Three members of the Herschel family are giants among those who laid the foundation of today''s astronomical knowledge.

Saturn's sweet surprises

New rings, long-lost spokes, and methane lakes highlight the Cassini spacecraft's latest discoveries at Saturn.

Online extra: Saturn on display

Cassini''s cameras continue to perform magic at the ringed planet — although they can''t overshadow a terrific new Hubble movie.

Illustrated: Anatomy of a ringed planet

Saturn's beauty comes at a cost - and it's the moons that pay.

Explore forgotten Scorpius

To spice up your summer observing, zero in on these often overlooked deep-sky gems.

Online extra: Forgotten Scorpius

Use this Autostar tour with your computerized Meade telescope.

How I discovered digital astroimaging

An experienced skyshooter trades in film for pixels - and opens up a new world.

Rebirth of a classic: the Porter Garden Telescope

One of the last century's most-celebrated small telescopes is set to make a comeback.

Departments

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Bob Berman's strange universe
Glenn Chaple's observing basics
Phil Harrington's binocular universe

Tour Apollo landing regions through binoculars

Stephen James O'Meara secret sky
News
The sky this month
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