Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

ESA releases striking new photos from Comet 67P

Rosetta’s camera captured images of the comet released earlier this week

ESA_Rosetta_20160911_LR
The image taken from the NAVCAM on September 11.
ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

ESA has released a series of vivid images taken by its Rosetta probe of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko to the public. Rosetta is will be ending its mission on September 30 with a controlled crash onto the comet. There it will join Philae, the probe’s lost lander rediscovered earlier this month.


Rosetta was 5.46807 miles (8.8 km) away from the comet when it took the first of the images on August 31. The image shows steep slopes in the Hathor region, an area on the comet that consists of a 900 meter (2952.76 feet) cliff with marked lines, streaks, and small terraces. The smoother terrains of Hapi, a region on the comet’s neck, is also visible in the image.


The other image, taken on September 11, reveals the Wosret region, which is just opposite Hathor. This image shows that the Wosret region has many different terrains, some smooth and others jagged and fractured.


264 NAVCAM images from July 27 to August 9 were also released earlier this week. They are available for viewing in the Archive Image Browser.
0

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Read and share your comments on this article
Comment on this article
Want to leave a comment?
Only registered members of Astronomy.com are allowed to comment on this article. Registration is FREE and only takes a couple minutes.

Login or Register now.
0 comments
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter. View our Privacy Policy.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
RCLP_ASY_0919_mediumrectangle

Explore NASA's missions to Saturn, Pluto and Jupiter in this free PDF curated by Astronomy magazine.

Find us on Facebook