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Weird Object: Fermi Bubbles

No. 1: Double Bubble, Toil and Trouble

RELATED TOPICS: MILKY WAY | FERMI BUBBLES
FermiFiller
FERMI-MENT FILLER. Enormous expanding bubbles of ultra-powerful gamma rays, each centered on nothingness, meet at our galaxy’s core, as depicted in this illustration of the Milky Way. Discovered in 2010, the origin of these bubbles remains a complete mystery. 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

In November 2010, astronomers using NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope announced an astonishing discovery. Emanating from the center of our Milky Way Galaxy are two bubbles made solely of powerful gamma rays. 

This would have been strange enough if the bubbles, expanding at 2.2 million mph (3.5 million km/h), were concentric — a bubble within a bubble — with both centered at the galaxy’s core. But no, the two enormous spheres each hover in seemingly empty space above and below the black hole in the Milky Way’s nucleus. They are tangent to each other, touching at the galactic center to form a squat hourglass shape. The entire structure looks like the number 8 or a sideways infinity symbol. 

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