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Hello, Moon

Our nearest neighbor in space doesn’t just shine at night.
Most people associate the Sun with day and the Moon with night — and many mythologies tell us why this is so. But myths are myths, and perhaps they are the reason why some non-astronomers think that something is wrong if they see the Moon during the day.

In fact, the Moon is quite noticeable at various times on most days throughout its monthly cycle (except for about two to three days before or after New Moon).

Scanners

Once the Sun rises, humans seem to be naturally programmed to look (literally) down and out, but not necessarily up. This is mainly a protective mechanism due to the immense brilliance of the solar disk. But up is where you’d have to direct your gaze most of the time to see the daytime Moon.

I tried being a daytime skywatcher for a couple of weeks, noting where my vision takes me naturally throughout the day. What I discovered was, in a sense, biblical: “Let your eyes look straight ahead; fix your gaze directly before you” (Proverbs 4:25). My gaze remained relatively focused forward with occasional sweeps from side to side.

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