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February 2016

ASY160201
The world's best-selling astronomy magazine offers you the most exciting, visually stunning, and timely coverage of the heavens above. Each monthly issue includes expert science reporting, vivid color photography, complete sky coverage, spot-on observing tips, informative telescope reviews, and much more! All this in an easy-to-understand, user-friendly style that's perfect for astronomers at any level.

Features

Why we haven’t found another Earth. Yet.

The search for alien Earths is heating up. But there’s still no place like home.

Web Extra: In search of Dyson spheres

A half-century of advancements in the search for E.T.s has led scientists to find ways to track aliens who might not want to be found.

Mercury: Land of mystery and enchantment

With MESSENGER behind us and BepiColombo to come, planetary scientists seek to understand the puzzling innermost planet.

Web Extra: Mercury in the spotlight

Planetary scientists have discovered water ice in permanently shadowed craters at Mercury’s poles.

Illustrated: What happens when stars collide

A cosmic star crash may light up the galaxy or be nearly undetectable.

Target 25 treats in Leo

Pull out your biggest scope, and the galaxies in this kingly constellation will dazzle you.

Sharing the sky above Las Vegas

This new observatory shows that what happens in Vegas also can inspire and educate.

Stargazing in the city

Dark sites are great for veteran observers, but when throwing a star party for new friends, go where the people are.

Web Extra: Find where to observe in your neighborhood

Planetary scientists have discovered water ice in permanently shadowed craters at Mercury’s poles.

11 top winter binocular treats

Star clusters, asterisms, double stars, and even a nebula beckon cold-weather skygazers.

We test Nikon’s hot new astrocamera

The D810A full-frame sensor produces colorful, ultra-low-noise images.

In Every Issue

From the Editor
Letters
Web Talk
New Products
Breakthrough
Snapshot
Astro News
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