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July 2007

The world's best-selling astronomy magazine offers you the most exciting, visually stunning, and timely coverage of the heavens above. Each monthly issue includes expert science reporting, vivid color photography, complete sky coverage, spot-on observing tips, informative telescope reviews, and much more! All this in an easy-to-understand, user-friendly style that's perfect for astronomers at any level.

Features

Earth's deadly future

A brightening Sun will boil the seas and bake the continents a billion years from now. But that's nothing compared with what we can expect further down the road.

Online extra: How long will the Sun live?

The answer's not as straightforward as you might think, and even the question has some hidden assumptions.

How astronomers capture the universe in a test tube

New simulations and lab experiments unmask supernovae, black holes, and the universe's first moments.

Online extra: Jets in a bottle

Miniature versions of astrophysical plasma jets provide insights into their cosmic cousins.

The asteroid collectors

The Minor Planet Center tracks hundreds of thousands of asteroids - and one may be heading our way.

Online extra: A grand asteroid tour

Remote spacecraft and Earth-based radar give us views of these solar system wanderers their discoverers only dreamed about.

How large will telescopes get?

Move over, Keck. The colossal telescopes of the future will make discoveries that today's astronomers only dream about.

Online extra: On the prowl with the OWL Telescope

Watch this 100-meter scope in action in this animation.

All about the Lagoon Nebula

Explore the brightest stellar birthplace in the summer Milky Way.

Starry virtuoso

Celebrated for his mastery of deep-sky observing, Brian Skiff is also one of the most amateur-friendly astronomers.

Online extra: How dark can the night sky get?

Many people think of darkness as simply the lack of light, but actually there's a lot more to it than that.

MaxCam gets imagers started

Finger Lakes Instrumentation''s MaxCam ME2 CCD camera offers a host of features in a small package.

The brass and glass of astronomy's past

Antique telescopes, globes, and astrolabes fill the exhibit halls of Chicago's Adler Planetarium.

Departments

This month in Astronomy
Beautiful universe
Letters
Bob Berman's strange universe
Phil Harrington's binocular universe

Just what the doctor ordered

Stephen James O'Meara's secret sky
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