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What would happen if two neutron stars, each traveling at 90 percent the speed of light, struck each other head-on?

CHRISTOPHER PERISIE, CHELSEA, MASSACHUSETTS
Neutron stars are the smallest stars known. Although astronomers still don't know how big they are — measuring the size of such small objects at astronomical distances is incredibly difficult — they believe neutron stars are no more than 20 miles (32 kilometers) across. A chance collision between two stars this small is extremely unlikely in the vastness of space. It's possible only in a region of high stellar density, such as a globular cluster. Even there, you might have to wait 100 million years to see such a calamity.

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