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Weird Object: Milky Way Antimatter Fountain

No. 8: Rebellious Particles Without A Cause

RELATED TOPICS: ANTIMATTER
Makeawish
MAKE A WISH. Within the center of the Milky Way (bright reddish area in upper left), an unseen antimatter fountain spews thick geysers of positrons thousands of light-years above the galactic plane. 
2MASS/G. Kopan, R. Hurt

In 1928, the shy, brilliant physicist Paul Dirac predicted the existence of antimatter. When it was actually discovered 7 years later, Dirac should have become a household name. But his yearning to avoid publicity — he almost turned down the Nobel Prize — discouraged media attention, and he’s known today only among science geeks. 

Antimatter has the same appearance and behavior as ordinary matter. An antimatter Sun would look just like our normal one, and even spectroscopic analysis couldn’t tell them apart. But let an antimatter object touch anything made of conventional matter, and both would vanish in a violent flash. 

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