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Astronomy magazine editors share their thoughts about WorldWide Telescope

<i>Astronomy</i> staff
Astronomy magazine Editor David J. Eicher
"Microsoft's Worldwide Telescope will help to engage a whole new generation of skywatchers and science enthusiasts. Even as students struggle to find science education meaningful and exciting, this new software will dazzle the science-curious with a revolutionary view of the cosmos beyond their wildest dreams.

"The editors of Astronomy magazine are thrilled with Microsoft's WorldWide Telescope. Suddenly, cloudy nights, light pollution, and freezing temperatures fall away to an anytime-view of the universe in the best personal planetarium ever made. This revolutionary software goes hand-in hand with the world's leading astronomy magazine in bringing a new view of the cosmos to science buffs around the globe."

Read Dave's commentary, "How WorldWide Telescope will change the world".

Read Dave's biography here.
<i>Astronomy</i> staff
Astronomy magazine Senior Editor Michael Bakich
"WorldWide Telescope can bring a spectacular, interactive model of the night sky to everyone's computer. Now, as additional Internet-based content for our observing stories, editors at Astronomy can create mini-movies that will describe featured objects, pinpoint where they are in the sky, and, if the end-user has a go-to telescope, actually point the telescope toward each object. Finally, there's a platform that combines a realistic view of the sky, the best images, and telescope control -- and it's easy to use."

Read Michael's biography here.
<i>Astronomy</i> staff
Astronomy magazine Senior Editor Frank Reddy
"WorldWide Telescope (WWT) is an astronomy educator's dream. The seamless layering of different data sets lets everyone see the night sky in a whole new light.

"I've been involved in astronomy for decades. I've used just about every visualization tool out there. Yet moving through the sky in WWT's fluid interface gives me a better overall feel for what's where.

"Amateurs will be able to showcase their own images and share them through Astronomy's community portal. To an educator, WWT is a powerful astronomy presentation tool -- PowerPoint for the Cosmos.

"Microsoft has big plans for this tool. This much-anticipated launch is just the beginning."

Read Frank's news article about WorldWide Telescope here.

Read Frank's biography here.
Astronomy magazine editors are available to share their unique perspective on the significance of WWT. To schedule an interview, please contact Matt Quandt at 262.798.6484 or mquandt@kalmbach.com.
More WorldWide Telescope coverage from Astronomy.com
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