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Bright treasures in the constellation Leo

Check out what the Lion's den has to offer.
Harrington
Except for Ursa Major, Leo the Lion is the most easily recognizable constellation of the northern spring sky. Brilliant Regulus, the Lion’s heart, first draws our attention to the celestial king of the beasts. His head and body are framed by a distinctive curve of stars resembling a backward question mark or a farmer’s sickle, and a large triangle of stars to its east.

Regulus [Alpha (α) Leonis] marks the handle end of the Sickle asterism. Nicolas Copernicus is credited with naming this star Regulus, meaning “Little King” in Latin, although he was not the first to refer to it as kingly. Many ancient cultures — including the Arabians, Babylonians, and the Akkadians of Mesopotamia — also viewed it as celestial royalty.

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