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A look inside the constellation Hydra

Take a dip in a vast cosmic lake and start exploring the water snake’s head.
ChapleGlenn
Last December, we toured the constellation Triangulum. Small in size, it can be fully explored in a single evening, much like a fisherman can cover a small pond in one day. In that December article, I also promised to explain how you can explore an expansive constellation the same way an angler tackles a large body of water. 

So, is your telescope ready? Our target, the water snake Hydra, is a fearsome creature — both mythologically and astronomically.

Hydra is the largest of the 88 recognized constellations; with an area of 1,303 square degrees, it covers about 10 times as much sky as Triangulum. Hydra winds its way across part or all of eight zones of right ascension — far too much territory for a single observing session. What to do? Here’s a tactic I learned during my decades as an avid freshwater fisherman.

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