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Is Venus always either a “morning star” or an “evening star” during certain times of the year?

Ray Montello, League City, Texas
RELATED TOPICS: VENUS
Venus and the Moon 2010
Venus was an “evening star” when this photograph was taken, May 15, 2010.
Cooper

Unfortunately, Venus’ path through the sky is a bit more complicated than that. This autumn, Earth’s neighbor shines brilliantly in the west after sunset. It reaches its greatest elongation from the Sun — its greatest angular distance from the Sun on the sky — on November 1, when it lies 47° east of our star. The planet grows brighter as it falls back toward the Sun in our sky, reaching its peak in early December. This “evening star” then shines at magnitude –4.9 — some 25 times brighter than the night sky’s brightest star, Sirius.

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