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December 2009

The December 2009 Astronomy unveils the latest images from the repaired Hubble Space Telescope, explains what neutrinos can tell us about the universe, teaches beginners how to observe comets, and more. The issue also includes Astronomy's "Sky Guide 2010," a 16-page preview of next year's noteworthy sky events. Video: Editor David J. Eicher previews the December 2009 issue.

Features

Astronomy magazine's Sky Guide 2010

Bright planets, streaking meteors, and total eclipses of the Sun and Moon highlight an exceptional observing year.

Hubble's grand new vistas

Early results from the space telescope's new camera and spectrograph prove there's a lot of life left in the aging observatory.

What can neutrinos tell us about the universe?

Astronomers are studying subatomic particles from supernovae and other energetic phenomena, but such particles are difficult to detect.

Web extra: On the hunt for neutrinos

Many facilities have been involved in searching for these mysterious particles.

Top 10 winter Milky Way treats

These must-see star clusters and nebulae look their best in this season's crisp air.

Web extra: More winter Milky Way treats

These beautiful images will make your eyes water without cold weather.

How to observe comets

Nothing thrills skywatchers like a new comet, especially if it's bright. Follow these tips to be ready for the next one.

Web extra: How to determine atmospheric extinction

Use this table to refine your comet observing.

Celestron revives a classic scope

With the Omni XLT 127, Celestron has made its signature 5-inch scope even better.
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