Training for the Moon
NASA

Sending a human to walk on the Moon was an amazing feat of engineering that took thousands of rocket scientists. But there were other groups of experts behind Apollo — and not all were at NASA. Beyond the zero-gravity tests and countless hours in simulators, geologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) also helped turn astronauts into scientists. They helped test equipment and showed astronauts how to collect samples and geologically interpret earthly moonscapes. Without this dedication to getting things right, the Apollo missions might have been little more than rocket ship stunts.

NASA

Meteor Crater: Training Apollo's first lunar scientists

Eugene Shoemaker and other geologists played a key role in the Apollo program, teaching astronauts to read the lunar surface.

Learn more
NASA

Cinder Lake: Blasting crater fields to test drive Moon cars

Before the first car toured the Moon, Apollo astronauts test drove the lunar rover around dynamite blasted craters.

Learn more
NASA

Hawaii’s Big Island: Astronauts explore a moonscape on Earth

The volcanic island chain made the perfect site to learn about lunar volcanism.

Learn more
NASA

The ‘sim’: Apollo astronauts survive a training gauntlet

Apollo astronauts spent tens of thousands of hours practicing in every sort of spaceflight and spacewalk simulation NASA engineers could dream up.

Learn more
NASA

Underwater training: Astronauts use swimming pools to simulate low gravity

NASA had its Apollo crews practice their trips to space by venturing underwater — and occasionally, by just floating on it.

Learn more
NASA

Exploring Iceland: Apollo astronauts took a geological field trip

The so-called land of fire and ice offered NASA a prime training ground to test their astronauts' skills in the field.

Learn more
NASA

Lowell Observatory: Apollo astronauts' crash course on Moon mapping

Astronomers taught Apollo astronauts how to read lunar topography with the same telescopes used to map the surface.

Learn more

Here is the article head for the article

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Learn more

Here is the article head for the article

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Learn more

Here is the article head for the article

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Learn more

Here is the article head for the article

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Learn more

Reaching For The Stars, Grounded In Tradition

As a space-grant institution, Texas A&M University is contributing research and talent to support NASA's missions to the moon, Mars and beyond.

Learn more