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Nasty behavior

Hubble has uncovered surprising new clues about a hefty, rapidly aging star nicknamed Nasty whose behavior has never been seen before

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Hubble at 25

How the space telescope changed the cosmos

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Spring rings

Saturn is at its 2015 peak, shining brilliantly all night

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Apollo exclusive

An in-depth interview, including video footage, with astronaut Jim Lovell on his experiences with Apollo 8 and Apollo 13

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Magnetar mystery

A neutron star is exhibiting some unusual X-ray behavior

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Uwingu Mars

Name a crater ... make an impact!

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Sign Up for Astronomy's five-part Observing Essentials email series!

Ends July 24, 2015

Heart of darkness

Astronomers discover new kind of "dark" globular star cluster

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Indonesian Islands Eclipse

Explore Bali and witness a total solar eclipse in March 2016 with Astronomy magazine and TravelQuest International

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Asteroid Day

The truth about the impact threat facing Earth

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Stellar beginnings

The first known example of a globular cluster about to be born

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Join Astronomy's Aurora Adventure

Experience a once-in-a-lifetime northern lights tour with Astronomy magazine and TravelQuest International

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Take the Universe with You!

Huge halo

The Andromeda Galaxy's halo is much bigger than previously thought

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Nasty behavior

Hubble has uncovered surprising new clues about a hefty, rapidly aging star nicknamed Nasty whose behavior has never been seen before

Learn more »

PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all »

Imaging the Sun

We just received this report from longtime contributor John Chumack: The other evening around 5:30 p.m., my daughter, Kayla, got a bit bored waiting to go to a movie with some friends. She had an hour to kill, so I asked her if she wanted to learn how to image the Sun. “Sure,” she said. We went out to the backyard observatory and she opened and rotated the dome while I prepped the equipment. She captured lots of data in about 40 minutes. I’m so proud of her; she did a good job, asked a lot of great questions, and — with Dad's help processing — got this fine result. (Lunt 60mm/50F Hydrogen-alpha telescope, QHY CCD QHY5IIL CCD camera, taken May 19, 2015)
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