Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '
LunarEclipseS_sliderlarge

Sharing totality

Submit your lunar eclipse photos to our Online Reader Gallery to share your experience with others!

Learn more »

Meet Mars

The Red Planet reaches its peak in the constellation Virgo this month

Learn more »

New moon?

A new small icy object discovered within the rings of Saturn

Learn more »

Starmus_rotatorlarge

Starmus 2014 Rocks Astronomy!

Join astronomy’s greatest minds in the Canary Islands, September 22–27, 2014. New speakers continue to be announced!

Get the latest info »

Astronomy on DVD!

Bring the cosmos to your computer!

Order now »

Student Story Contest!

Enter to win a copy of David A. Aguilar's new book!

Learn more »

P22125_564x453

Introducing Cosmic Origins!

Our one-of-a-kind interactive app puts the universe at your fingertips!

Learn more »

Why Join?

Get more from Astronomy.com!

Register Today »

Exact expansion

The most precise measurement yet of cosmic expansion

Learn more »

P20974_app_563x452_2

GET IT NOW!

Astronomy is available on the App Store!

Learn more »

COSMOS Hangouts

Get expert insights on each episode

Watch now »

Enceladus ocean

New evidence that Saturn’s moon harbors a large underground ocean

Learn more »

Cosmic Adventures

Animals launched into space

Watch now »

Uwingu Mars

Name a crater ... make an impact!

Learn more »

Sharing totality

Submit your lunar eclipse photos to our Online Reader Gallery to share your experience with others!

Learn more »

PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all »

The April 2014 total lunar eclipse

This Florida photographer sent in this composite image when the April 14/15, 2014 total lunar eclipse was barely half over. Viewers across North America who had clear skies saw a stunning celestial sight. As Earth's shadow enveloped the Moon, 1st-magnitude Spica (Alpha Virginis) appeared at the 5 o'clock position near our satellite. And even before the event, you could see brilliant orange Mars to the Moon's upper right and Saturn far to its left. In this montage, the partial phases start with the Moon at the top, then progress in a clockwise direction. Finally, during totality, the Moon took on an orange hue, and that's the central image here.
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Loading...