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Double trouble

Hubble finds that the nearest quasar, the brilliant core of an active galaxy, is powered by a double black hole

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Hubble at 25

How the space telescope changed the cosmos

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Radio phoenix

A faded electron cloud comes back to life after galaxy collision

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Year of Pluto

Revelations of a distant world

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Two is better than one

The remarkable complexity of the bipolar Twin Jet Nebula

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Indonesian Islands Eclipse

Explore Bali and witness a total solar eclipse in March 2016 with Astronomy magazine and TravelQuest International

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Icy exploration

NASA’s next big spacecraft mission could visit an ice giant

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New episode every other week!

Turn on your mind to what's really going on in the universe

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Sharper scenes

Dawn reveals exciting new views from Ceres

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Uwingu Mars

Name a crater ... make an impact!

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Exclusive podcast series

Editor David J. Eicher conducts extensive interviews with the world's top astrophysicists, planetary scientists, and cosmologists

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Take the Universe With You!

New episode!

Seth Shostak: Life in the universe

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Double trouble

Hubble finds that the nearest quasar, the brilliant core of an active galaxy, is powered by a double black hole

Learn more »

PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all »

April eclipse

The photographer took this shot April 4, 2015, as the partially eclipsed Moon slowly started to set behind city buildings in Toronto, Canada. The Moon’s red color is due to its position near the horizon where the atmosphere between our satellite and the camera was thickest. Note also the dark area of sky the Moon is in. That’s Earth’s shadow. (Canon Powershot G1X Mark II set at f/8, ISO 200, 1/20-second exposure, taken April 4, 2015, at 6:49 a.m. EDT)
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